THEN

During his 31- year tenure, Texas Children’s Physician-in-Chief Dr. Ralph D. Feigin taught and trained hundreds of bright young students and residents who went on to become prominent pediatricians, researchers and physician leaders.

During his 31- year tenure, Texas Children’s Physician-in-Chief Dr. Ralph D. Feigin taught and trained hundreds of bright young students and residents who went on to become prominent pediatricians, researchers and physician leaders.

In 1977, Dr. Ralph D. Feigin became Texas Children’s second physician-in-chief. His goals were to develop and sustain an outstanding medical faculty and to expand their knowledge to ensure quality care and medical advances were passed on to future generations. Dr. Russell J. Blattner was Texas Children’s first physician-in-chief. He established Texas Children’s teaching and research affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine.

Texas Children's first physician-in-chief, Dr.  Russell J. Blattner, believed that Houston’s recently built children’s hospital should focus on teaching and research, as well as treating sick children. His vision for Texas Children’s included an affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine. So, on February 1, 1954, Blattner’s aspirations were fulfilled when it was decided that the chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor would also serve as the physician-in-chief at Texas Children’s. This historic agreement made Texas Children’s the only hospital in the Texas Medical Center that had a true medical school affiliation. 


NOW

Dr. Jennifer Arnold conducting a Simulation Center labor and delivery exercise.

Dr. Jennifer Arnold conducting a Simulation Center labor and delivery exercise.

Today, Dr. Mark W. Kline, Texas Children’s third physician-in-chief, continues the legacy of his predecessors by cultivating the world’s best and brightest medical minds.

Under Dr. Kline’s leadership, the depth and breadth of Texas Children’s residency and fellowship programs allows physicians to gain hands-on experience in a unique and varied spectrum of pediatric subspecialties, including pediatric critical care medicine, pediatric neurosurgery, medical genetics, perinatal surgery and global health. Other programs include:

Global Health Residency – In conjunction with Baylor International Pediatrics AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) at Texas Children’s, five physician trainees spend a year of their residency providing care to children with HIV/AIDS and other illnesses in one of BIPAI’s clinics across Africa or East Asia. 

Perinatal Surgery Fellowship – This fellowship allows physicians to cross-train in both maternal fetal medicine and pediatric surgery, resulting in well-rounded physicians who are skilled in both complementary specialties.

Pediatric Surgery Fellowship – As the first program of its kind in the country, this one-year program trains fellows to become leaders in all areas of pediatric surgery, including cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, orthopedics, urology, otolaryngology, dental, plastic, craniofacial surgery and trauma services.  

In 2016, more than 1,000 candidates applied for 43 residency positions. And since 1957, more than 500 residents have graduated, pursuing a number of career paths, including subspecialty fellowship training, private practice and academic medicine. 


A look back at Match Day 2014